@patrimoraphoto

@patrimoraphoto

Archaeological photographer in Egypt (@qubbetelhawa,@thebanproject, Swiss Mission-Elephantine & Syene).MA-Egyptology(@livuni). Based in Barcelona.

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One of the aims of the MKTP is to study the geography and landscape of Thebes in the early Middle Kingdom.

To accomplish this goal during the short study season that has just taken place the last four weeks, Andrés Martín and PhD candidate Didi el-Behaedi have been focusing on duties of GIS, and landscape archaeology in the areas of Asasif, Deir el-Bahari, Dra Abu el-Naga and el-Tarif.

Due to the high temperatures, most of the days reaching 44 degrees, Didi and Andrés have been roaming around the necropoles collecting coordinates with the new Trimble R12 and georeferencing since very early in the morning. 

Here you can see them at 5:30am collecting points from the top of the Theban hill, right above the tomb of Ipi (TT315) where the MKTP works since 2015, and enveloped by the most majestic, fascinating and captivating views of the Theban area.

We are indeed very privileged to work here!

@thebanproject (UAH, July 2021)

#middlekingdomthebanproject #luxor #deirelbahari #asasif #egyptiantomb #archaeologicalsite #inthefield #archaeology #egyptology #archaeologylife #landscapearchaeology #geolocalisation #trimble #desert #walkinginthedesert #astonishingview #egyptiantemple #hatshepsut #mentuhotepii #photography #landscapephotography #environtmentalportrait #nikon #nikonphotography #nikond750 #fisheyelens #nikkor8_15mm #archaeoinstagram #archaeologicalphotography

@patrimoraphoto

One of the aims of the MKTP is to study the geography and landscape of Thebes in the early Middle Kingdom. To accomplish this goal during the short study season that has just taken place the last four weeks, Andrés Martín and PhD candidate Didi el-Behaedi have been focusing on duties of GIS, and landscape archaeology in the areas of Asasif, Deir el-Bahari, Dra Abu el-Naga and el-Tarif. Due to the high temperatures, most of the days reaching 44 degrees, Didi and Andrés have been roaming around the necropoles collecting coordinates with the new Trimble R12 and georeferencing since very early in the morning. Here you can see them at 5:30am collecting points from the top of the Theban hill, right above the tomb of Ipi (TT315) where the MKTP works since 2015, and enveloped by the most majestic, fascinating and captivating views of the Theban area. We are indeed very privileged to work here! @thebanproject (UAH, July 2021) #middlekingdomthebanproject #luxor #deirelbahari #asasif #egyptiantomb #archaeologicalsite #inthefield #archaeology #egyptology #archaeologylife #landscapearchaeology #geolocalisation #trimble #desert #walkinginthedesert #astonishingview #egyptiantemple #hatshepsut #mentuhotepii #photography #LandscapePhotography #environtmentalportrait #nikon #nikonphotography #nikonD750 #fisheyelens #nikkor8_15mm #archaeoinstagram #archaeologicalphotography

After a 15 months stop, three days ago the Middle Kingdom Theban Project resumed its work in the necropolis of Deir el-Bahari, and started a short study season that will last 3 weeks. 

During these past days, the work focused on the findings of the embalming deposit of Ipi (re)discovered in 2017. 

Andrés, Didi, Hazem and Dr Antonio Morales, the director of the project, have been selecting the pieces of linen to be photographed in the next few days, and have been also checking the 56 jars found in the cachette in order to find the ones that have ink-marks on them, so later on a detailed infrared photography can be done. 

This picture depicts the moment when Hazem Shared examines thoroughly one of the jars, looking for those ink-marks that many years ago the ancient potters draw in the vessels that stored all the embalming material used in the mummification ritual of Amenemhat I’s vizier. 

@thebanproject (UAH, season 2021).

#middlekingdomthebanproject #egypt #deirelbahari #egyptiantomb #inthefield #embalmingdeposit #embalmingcachette #mummification #pottery #ceramology #ancient #artefacts #studyingthepast #backtothefield #middlekingdom #pharaoh #amenemhati #vizier #archaeology #backtothefield #archaeologicalsite #archaeologicalexcavation #archaeoinstagram #archaeologicalphotography #photography #portrait #environtmentalportrait #lightandshadow #nikon #nikonphotography #nikond750

@patrimoraphoto

After a 15 months stop, three days ago the Middle Kingdom Theban Project resumed its work in the necropolis of Deir el-Bahari, and started a short study season that will last 3 weeks. During these past days, the work focused on the findings of the embalming deposit of Ipi (re)discovered in 2017. Andrés, Didi, Hazem and Dr Antonio Morales, the director of the project, have been selecting the pieces of linen to be photographed in the next few days, and have been also checking the 56 jars found in the cachette in order to find the ones that have ink-marks on them, so later on a detailed infrared photography can be done. This picture depicts the moment when Hazem Shared examines thoroughly one of the jars, looking for those ink-marks that many years ago the ancient potters draw in the vessels that stored all the embalming material used in the mummification ritual of Amenemhat I’s vizier. @thebanproject (UAH, season 2021). #middlekingdomthebanproject #egypt #deirelbahari #egyptiantomb #inthefield #embalmingdeposit #embalmingcachette #mummification #pottery #ceramology #ancient #artefacts #studyingthepast #backtothefield #middlekingdom #pharaoh #amenemhati #vizier #archaeology #backtothefield #archaeologicalsite #archaeologicalexcavation #archaeoinstagram #archaeologicalphotography #photography #portrait #environtmentalportrait #lightandshadow #nikon #nikonphotography #nikonD750

There is something mesmerizing about this picture. Surrounded by the -apparent- chaos of hundreds of boxes containing all sorts of materials found during the excavation of QH33, PhD candidate Luisa García sits quietly in the south east corner of the pillared hall of the tomb. 

There is something captivating in this picture. Surrounded by a dark atmosphere, a twinkling light helps Luisa to study the fragments of pottery found while she was excavating tomb QH35p, in the north side of the hill. 

There is something enthralling in this picture. One can feel the loneliness, the sacrifice, the effort and the determination of a researcher who devotes her life to what she is passionate about. 

There is something fascinating in this picture, and every time I stumble upon it, for a while, I can’t keep my eyes off of it… 

@qubbetelhawa (UJA, season 2018). 

#proyectoqubbetelhawa #aswan  #ancientegypt #egyptiantomb #insidethetomb #inthefield #archaeologicalsite #archaeology #archaeologylife #phdlife #egyptology #egyptologist #notallisdig #studyingthepast #diggingthepast #ancientartefacts #science #effort #sacrifice #fightforyourdreams #photography #archaeologicalphotography #environtmentalportrait #portrait #lightsandshadows #nikon #nikond750 #archaeoinstagram #yourshotphotographer #thephotosociety

@patrimoraphoto

There is something mesmerizing about this picture. Surrounded by the -apparent- chaos of hundreds of boxes containing all sorts of materials found during the excavation of QH33, PhD candidate Luisa García sits quietly in the south east corner of the pillared hall of the tomb. There is something captivating in this picture. Surrounded by a dark atmosphere, a twinkling light helps Luisa to study the fragments of pottery found while she was excavating tomb QH35p, in the north side of the hill. There is something enthralling in this picture. One can feel the loneliness, the sacrifice, the effort and the determination of a researcher who devotes her life to what she is passionate about. There is something fascinating in this picture, and every time I stumble upon it, for a while, I can’t keep my eyes off of it… @qubbetelhawa (UJA, season 2018). #proyectoqubbetelhawa #aswan #ancientegypt #egyptiantomb #insidethetomb #inthefield #archaeologicalsite #archaeology #archaeologylife #phdlife #egyptology #egyptologist #notallisdig #studyingthepast #diggingthepast #ancientartefacts #science #effort #sacrifice #fightforyourdreams #photography #archaeologicalphotography #environtmentalportrait #portrait #lightsandshadows #nikon #nikonD750 #archaeoinstagram #yourshotphotographer #thephotosociety

Not all discoveries are as impressive as colorful coffins or artefacts made out of precious materials. In fact, the objects that archaeologists usually find the most in the excavations are those made out of pottery, and Qubbet el-Hawa is not an exception. 

Those objects are very important, not only because one can analyze the contents and therefore know the use ancient Egyptians gave them and get to know more about their daily life, but also because pottery is a very useful chronological indicator.

Only in the tomb QH33 more than a thousand pottery objects have been found, most of them broken. The ceramologists of the team try to puzzle these sherds together when possible before measure and drawing them, in the ceramology lab located at the entrance of the tomb. 

In the picture, Phd candidate and ceramologist Desirée Pérez is measuring the upper part of a small carinated jar made out of marl clay. This one is not complete, but luckily there are some complete examples of the same kind of jar found in the necropolis. The decoration used in this jar is called by the specialists “brown and red painted” and is a typical decoration used at the end of the Second Intermediate Period and the beginning of the XVIII Dynasty (c. 1782 - 1350 BCE).

@qubbetelhawa (UJA, season 2018).

#qubbetelhawa #aswan #egypt #ancientegypt #egyptiantomb #egyptology #archaeology #archaeologylife #ceramology #archaeologicalsite #inthefield #studyingthepast #desert #desertmoments #pottery #sherd #ancient #ancientartefacts #culturalheritage #photography #portrait #environtmentalportrait #archaeologicalphotography #nikon #nikoneurope #nikond750 #archaeoinstagram #people_infinity #specialistatwork #spicollective

@patrimoraphoto

Not all discoveries are as impressive as colorful coffins or artefacts made out of precious materials. In fact, the objects that archaeologists usually find the most in the excavations are those made out of pottery, and Qubbet el-Hawa is not an exception. Those objects are very important, not only because one can analyze the contents and therefore know the use ancient Egyptians gave them and get to know more about their daily life, but also because pottery is a very useful chronological indicator. Only in the tomb QH33 more than a thousand pottery objects have been found, most of them broken. The ceramologists of the team try to puzzle these sherds together when possible before measure and drawing them, in the ceramology lab located at the entrance of the tomb. In the picture, Phd candidate and ceramologist Desirée Pérez is measuring the upper part of a small carinated jar made out of marl clay. This one is not complete, but luckily there are some complete examples of the same kind of jar found in the necropolis. The decoration used in this jar is called by the specialists “brown and red painted” and is a typical decoration used at the end of the Second Intermediate Period and the beginning of the XVIII Dynasty (c. 1782 - 1350 BCE). @qubbetelhawa (UJA, season 2018). #qubbetelhawa #aswan #egypt #ancientegypt #egyptiantomb #egyptology #archaeology #archaeologylife #ceramology #archaeologicalsite #inthefield #studyingthepast #desert #desertmoments #pottery #sherd #ancient #ancientartefacts #culturalheritage #photography #portrait #environtmentalportrait #archaeologicalphotography #nikon #nikoneurope #nikonD750 #archaeoinstagram #people_infinity #specialistatwork #spicollective

In 2017, Dr Vicente Barba continued excavating in the intact tomb QH34aa, discovered the previous archaeological season. 

Many kilos of sand were covering the 10 individuals buried there, because the mudbrick wall used to seal the tomb collapsed at some point in antiquity and all the sand used to cover the 10 meter shaft entered in the tomb. 

Of this 10 individuals only two of them were buried inside coffins, both dated to the Middle Kingdom. One, of a woman named Sattjeni, was very well preserved, but the other one, of a man called Dedu-tjeni, was in a really poor condition due to the attack of ravenous termites. 

Once the restorer of the team Teresa López-Obregón secured the little remains of Dedu-tjeni’s coffin and they were removed to the restoration lab in tomb QH33, Vicente continued excavating the area were Dedu-tjeni’s body was resting. First, his funerary mask, with a colourful headband, appeared through the sand, greeting Vicente with a quiet smile of cartonnage. He continued excavating the body the following days and no more funerary objects were associated to it. 

However, this burial was going to give us a surprise. Although in the hieroglyphs preserved in the coffin it was clear that it belonged to a man named Dedu-tjeni, who was a scribe and a priest, the one buried inside was actually a young woman of 18 years old! whose name sadly will remain unknown to us for the rest of eternity. 

@qubbetelhawa (UJA, season 2017) 

#proyectoqubbetelhawa #qubbetelhawa #ancientegypt #egyptiantomb #intacttomb #ancientburial #middlekingdom #coffin #egyptiancoffin #insidethetomb #funerarymask #cartonnage #ancientsmile #ancientcolours #hieroglyphs #archaeology #archaeologylife #egyptology #discovery #archaeologicalsite #inthefield #photography #portrait #environmentalportrait #nikon #nikond750 #archaeoinstagram #nikoneurope #yourshotphotographer #thephotosociety

@patrimoraphoto

In 2017, Dr Vicente Barba continued excavating in the intact tomb QH34aa, discovered the previous archaeological season. Many kilos of sand were covering the 10 individuals buried there, because the mudbrick wall used to seal the tomb collapsed at some point in antiquity and all the sand used to cover the 10 meter shaft entered in the tomb. Of this 10 individuals only two of them were buried inside coffins, both dated to the Middle Kingdom. One, of a woman named Sattjeni, was very well preserved, but the other one, of a man called Dedu-tjeni, was in a really poor condition due to the attack of ravenous termites. Once the restorer of the team Teresa López-Obregón secured the little remains of Dedu-tjeni’s coffin and they were removed to the restoration lab in tomb QH33, Vicente continued excavating the area were Dedu-tjeni’s body was resting. First, his funerary mask, with a colourful headband, appeared through the sand, greeting Vicente with a quiet smile of cartonnage. He continued excavating the body the following days and no more funerary objects were associated to it. However, this burial was going to give us a surprise. Although in the hieroglyphs preserved in the coffin it was clear that it belonged to a man named Dedu-tjeni, who was a scribe and a priest, the one buried inside was actually a young woman of 18 years old! whose name sadly will remain unknown to us for the rest of eternity. @qubbetelhawa (UJA, season 2017) #proyectoqubbetelhawa #qubbetelhawa #ancientegypt #egyptiantomb #intacttomb #ancientburial #middlekingdom #coffin #egyptiancoffin #insidethetomb #funerarymask #cartonnage #ancientsmile #ancientcolours #hieroglyphs #archaeology #archaeologylife #egyptology #discovery #archaeologicalsite #inthefield #photography #portrait #environmentalportrait #nikon #nikonD750 #archaeoinstagram #nikoneurope #yourshotphotographer #thephotosociety

It’s a busy morning in Ipi’s tomb (TT315). 

Dr Mohamed Osman, the leading archaeologist of this burial area, is working in the excavation of the upper courtyard of the tomb (in the background), helped by more than 75 skilled Egyptians (some of them working with the team since the very beginning in 2015).

All the sand and debris dug up in the excavation pit is then taken down the hill to the sieving area (in the foreground), where Mohamed el-Saadi, Hassan and Mohamed el-Arabi will sieve that sand in case any tiny artifact has been missed. 

@thebanproject (UAH, April 2018)

#middlekingdomthebanproject #egypt #luxor #ancientegypt #deirelbahari #egyptiantomb #egyptianvizier #pharaoh #inthefield #egyptology #thebantomb #desert #desertmoments #archaeologicalsite #archaeology #archaeologylife #thedig #sievingthepast #sieving #studyingthepast #diggingthepast #culturalheritage #photography #nikon #environtmentalportrait #nikoneurope #instaphoto #archaeologicalphotography #archaeologicalphotographer #archaeoinstagram

@patrimoraphoto

It’s a busy morning in Ipi’s tomb (TT315). Dr Mohamed Osman, the leading archaeologist of this burial area, is working in the excavation of the upper courtyard of the tomb (in the background), helped by more than 75 skilled Egyptians (some of them working with the team since the very beginning in 2015). All the sand and debris dug up in the excavation pit is then taken down the hill to the sieving area (in the foreground), where Mohamed el-Saadi, Hassan and Mohamed el-Arabi will sieve that sand in case any tiny artifact has been missed. @thebanproject (UAH, April 2018) #middlekingdomthebanproject #egypt #luxor #ancientegypt #deirelbahari #egyptiantomb #egyptianvizier #pharaoh #inthefield #egyptology #thebantomb #desert #desertmoments #archaeologicalsite #archaeology #archaeologylife #thedig #sievingthepast #sieving #studyingthepast #diggingthepast #culturalheritage #photography #nikon #environtmentalportrait #nikoneurope #instaphoto #archaeologicalphotography #archaeologicalphotographer #archaeoinstagram

In the magazine located in Gebel el-Sisha, three tables are full of pottery sherds, spreaded as if they were pieces of a jigsaw puzzle. 

Rais Abid, in the picture, is helping PhD-des Mariola Hepa to sort out all these pottery fragments, linked to the animal cemetery located in the so-called Area 2, in the city of Aswan, where the Swiss Institut in Cairo is working since the ‘80s. They discovered 11 animal skeletons in this cemetery, dated in the Ptolemaic period, and all of them were covered with a big fragment of pottery (some broken due to the passage of time), as if they were kind of a “coffin” for the animal. 

You can find another parallel, for instance, at the animal cemetery in the early Roman port of Berenice (recently in the news) were nearly 600 cats and dogs (and some monkeys) were buried there, and many of their skeletons were protected with huge pottery fragments. 

(Side note: I love Abid’s ring!). 

#swissinstitute #oldaswan #syene #egypt #ancientegypt #ptolemaic #ceramology #pottery #animalcemetery #coffin #sarcophagus #notallisdig #jigsawpuzzle #ancientpuzzle #inthefield #ancient #ancientartefacts #studyingthepast #necropolis #animalnecropolis #egyptology #egyptiantomb #photography #archaeologicalphotography #portrait #qufti #environtmentalportrait #nikon #nikond750 #archaeoinstagram

@patrimoraphoto

In the magazine located in Gebel el-Sisha, three tables are full of pottery sherds, spreaded as if they were pieces of a jigsaw puzzle. Rais Abid, in the picture, is helping PhD-des Mariola Hepa to sort out all these pottery fragments, linked to the animal cemetery located in the so-called Area 2, in the city of Aswan, where the Swiss Institut in Cairo is working since the ‘80s. They discovered 11 animal skeletons in this cemetery, dated in the Ptolemaic period, and all of them were covered with a big fragment of pottery (some broken due to the passage of time), as if they were kind of a “coffin” for the animal. You can find another parallel, for instance, at the animal cemetery in the early Roman port of Berenice (recently in the news) were nearly 600 cats and dogs (and some monkeys) were buried there, and many of their skeletons were protected with huge pottery fragments. (Side note: I love Abid’s ring!). #swissinstitute #oldaswan #Syene #egypt #ancientegypt #ptolemaic #ceramology #pottery #animalcemetery #coffin #sarcophagus #notallisdig #jigsawpuzzle #ancientpuzzle #inthefield #ancient #ancientartefacts #studyingthepast #necropolis #animalnecropolis #egyptology #egyptiantomb #photography #archaeologicalphotography #portrait #qufti #environtmentalportrait #nikon #nikonD750 #archaeoinstagram

Inside the tomb QH32, once the archaeological goals of the season were fulfilled, the hypostyle hall turned into a ceramology lab to work on all the pottery fragments found within the inner chambers. PhD candidate and ceramologist Ana Díaz was helping codirector and lead archaeologist of said tomb, Dr Jose Alba, in the reassembly of the hundred of sherds found in it. 
As if she was playing with an ancient puzzle of thousands of years, she is joining those little fragments with the aim of reconstructing the whole piece. The reassembling of sherds is a key aspect of the ceramology studies, not only because one can reconstruct the whole piece again from tiny sherds (and therefore see its style characteristics, such as the shape, decoration if any, etc), but also for statistical issues. 
@qubbetelhawa (UJA, season 2019) 
#qubbetelhawa #aswan #egypt #ancientegypt #egyptiantomb #hypostylehall #insidethetomb #egyptology #archaeology #archaeologylife #ceramology #reassemblingthepast #reassemblingpottery #ancient #ancientartefact #sherd #potterysherds #jigsaw #jigsawpuzzle #ancientpuzzle #phdlife #studyingthepast #photography #nikon #nikond750 #environmentalportrait #portrait #portraitphotography #shadow #archaeoinstagram

@patrimoraphoto

Inside the tomb QH32, once the archaeological goals of the season were fulfilled, the hypostyle hall turned into a ceramology lab to work on all the pottery fragments found within the inner chambers. PhD candidate and ceramologist Ana Díaz was helping codirector and lead archaeologist of said tomb, Dr Jose Alba, in the reassembly of the hundred of sherds found in it. As if she was playing with an ancient puzzle of thousands of years, she is joining those little fragments with the aim of reconstructing the whole piece. The reassembling of sherds is a key aspect of the ceramology studies, not only because one can reconstruct the whole piece again from tiny sherds (and therefore see its style characteristics, such as the shape, decoration if any, etc), but also for statistical issues. @qubbetelhawa (UJA, season 2019) #qubbetelhawa #aswan #egypt #ancientegypt #egyptiantomb #HypostyleHall #insidethetomb #egyptology #archaeology #archaeologylife #ceramology #reassemblingthepast #reassemblingpottery #ancient #ancientartefact #sherd #potterysherds #jigsaw #jigsawpuzzle #ancientpuzzle #phdlife #studyingthepast #photography #nikon #nikonD750 #environmentalportrait #portrait #portraitphotography #shadow #archaeoinstagram

I am so thrilled to share with you that in less than a month I will be roaming around the Deir el-Bahari and Asasif necropoleis, camera in hand, photographing the funerary complexes of Dagi, Djari and Ipi (and some of the ancient artifacts found in there) for the upcoming study season of the MKTP! A very small group of team members will go there, we’ll be only five of the more than 40 specialists working with this team, in order to advance as much work as possible and prepare for the 6th season which will be, hopefully and if the global situation allows it, at the end of this year. As the countdown moves forward to this short study season, here’s a bird’s eye view of Deir el-Bahari and Asasif, taken in April 2018 from a hot-air balloon. Can’t wait to be there again, after 14 months longing for this beautiful place, and share with you more pics of this impressive necropolis, this great team and our work there! @thebanproject #middlekingdomthebanproject #egypt #luxor #thebannecropolis #deirelbahari #asasif #egyptiantomb #middlekingdom #backtothefield #thisisegypt #missingegypt #aerialphotography #birdseyeview #hotairballoon #ramesseum #pharaoh #egyptology #science #adventure #photography #archaeologicalphotography #nikon #nikond750 #archaeology #archaeoinstagram #desert #egyptianlandscape #astonishingview #backtoegypt #lovingmyjob

@patrimoraphoto

I am so thrilled to share with you that in less than a month I will be roaming around the Deir el-Bahari and Asasif necropoleis, camera in hand, photographing the funerary complexes of Dagi, Djari and Ipi (and some of the ancient artifacts found in there) for the upcoming study season of the MKTP! A very small group of team members will go there, we’ll be only five of the more than 40 specialists working with this team, in order to advance as much work as possible and prepare for the 6th season which will be, hopefully and if the global situation allows it, at the end of this year. As the countdown moves forward to this short study season, here’s a bird’s eye view of Deir el-Bahari and Asasif, taken in April 2018 from a hot-air balloon. Can’t wait to be there again, after 14 months longing for this beautiful place, and share with you more pics of this impressive necropolis, this great team and our work there! @thebanproject #middlekingdomthebanproject #egypt #luxor #thebannecropolis #deirelbahari #asasif #egyptiantomb #middlekingdom #backtothefield #thisisegypt #missingegypt #AerialPhotography #birdseyeview #hotairballoon #ramesseum #pharaoh #egyptology #science #adventure #photography #archaeologicalphotography #nikon #nikonD750 #archaeology #archaeoinstagram #desert #egyptianlandscape #astonishingview #backtoegypt #lovingmyjob

We are often dazzled about big discoveries in the news regarding archaeology, either because of the monumentality of the discovery, the luxury materials found, the enormous quantity of artefacts recovered or even because it’s regarding a a “new” city, but we hear little about what happens next once the discovery is made. Sure, big discoveries are important, but sometimes are the small and less shinny ones that gives us more information about the past. Be it large or small, more or less significant, all discoveries follow the same process: they must be inventoried, measured, drawn, photographed and examined to a feasible extent. One needs to gather as much information as possible in the field, so the specialists will be able to continue their research back at home.
Here you can have a glimpse of this process, when back in 2019 Mahmoud Abu Marh was excavating the inner chamber of tomb QH32. Among the tones of linen bandages that covered the floor, he unearthed a small plaster mask, with no remains of painting on it, but with delicate handcrafted almond-shaped eyes, dimples in the cheeks and a smile (features that would date it most likely to the reigns of Hatshepsut or Tuthmosis III). In the third pic you can see Dr Jose Alba, codirector of the project and the leading archaeologist of QH32, inventorying that exact mask plus another one that was discovered close to it. Once the inventory number is given, and its saved in its bag, it will travel to the different labs located in the field, the draughtsman will draw it and will take its measures at the drawing lab, and at the photo studio it will be photographed on all its sides. Once this process is completed, it will be stored in the field magazine inside the tomb QH32, in case it needs to be studied further in the future. @qubbetelhawa #proyectoqubbetelhawa #qubbetelhawa #aswan #egypt #ancientegypt #egyptology #archaeology #archaeologylife #archaeologicalsite #discovery #egyptiantomb #inthefield #egyptianmask #pharaoh #hatshepsut #tuthmosesiii #inventory #discoveringthepast #studyingthepast #photography #portrait #environtmentalportrait #nikon #archaeoinstagram #nikond750 #ancient #artefact #ancienthistory #smile

@patrimoraphoto

We are often dazzled about big discoveries in the news regarding archaeology, either because of the monumentality of the discovery, the luxury materials found, the enormous quantity of artefacts recovered or even because it’s regarding a a “new” city, but we hear little about what happens next once the discovery is made. Sure, big discoveries are important, but sometimes are the small and less shinny ones that gives us more information about the past. Be it large or small, more or less significant, all discoveries follow the same process: they must be inventoried, measured, drawn, photographed and examined to a feasible extent. One needs to gather as much information as possible in the field, so the specialists will be able to continue their research back at home. Here you can have a glimpse of this process, when back in 2019 Mahmoud Abu Marh was excavating the inner chamber of tomb QH32. Among the tones of linen bandages that covered the floor, he unearthed a small plaster mask, with no remains of painting on it, but with delicate handcrafted almond-shaped eyes, dimples in the cheeks and a smile (features that would date it most likely to the reigns of Hatshepsut or Tuthmosis III). In the third pic you can see Dr Jose Alba, codirector of the project and the leading archaeologist of QH32, inventorying that exact mask plus another one that was discovered close to it. Once the inventory number is given, and its saved in its bag, it will travel to the different labs located in the field, the draughtsman will draw it and will take its measures at the drawing lab, and at the photo studio it will be photographed on all its sides. Once this process is completed, it will be stored in the field magazine inside the tomb QH32, in case it needs to be studied further in the future. @qubbetelhawa #proyectoqubbetelhawa #qubbetelhawa #aswan #egypt #ancientegypt #egyptology #archaeology #archaeologylife #archaeologicalsite #discovery #egyptiantomb #inthefield #egyptianmask #pharaoh #hatshepsut #tuthmosesiii #inventory #discoveringthepast #studyingthepast #photography #portrait #environtmentalportrait #nikon #archaeoinstagram #nikonD750 #ancient #artefact #ancienthistory #smile

The Swiss Institut has been working in the modern city of Aswan in order to study the ancient city of Syene (Swnw) since 1986. At the beginning, the works focused mainly on the Domitian temple, dedicated to the god Khnum (c. I CE) and the Isis temple, built during the reign of Ptolemy III (c II BCE).
Nowadays the project, which covers a broader area in the city, is directed by Dr Cornelius von Pilgrim and the fieldwork in the old city of Aswan is directed by subdirector Dr Wolfgang Müller. The aim is to study the history of the settlements in the east bank of the ancient Syene, the twin city of Elpehantine, in the Greco-roman period. 
In Spring of 2019, the works focused in the so-called Area 3 (one of the areas where the institute started working in the ’80s). In the first picture, you can see Shadli in the foreground, and Mohammed (on the left), on the very first days of the Spring archaeological season. Behind them, late period settlements and the remains of the Domitian temple, which was the only building of the old Syene visible since antiquity, rest throughout time. Shadli and Mohammed were removing all the dirt and the palm trees around the temple so the archaeologists could have a general idea of the later structures in the area. 
The second picture is a candid portrait of Shadli during a moment he was resting off of the hard work removing the dirt. I specially love his kind gaze which brings (to me at least), some kind of peace. 
If you want to know more about the work carried out in Old Aswan/Syene you can visit the Swiss Institut’s website: www.http://swissinst.ch/
#swissinstitut #aswan #oldaswan #syene #egypt #ancientegypt #settlement #ancientsite #culturalheritage #arcahaeology #archaeologicalsite #inthefield #temple #domitian #isis #knum #egyptiangods #ptolemyiii #pharaoh #lateperiod #grecoroman #photography #nikon #nikond750 #environtmentalportrait #portrait #shootingcandid #bnwphotography #archaeologicalphotographer #archaeoinstagram

@patrimoraphoto

The Swiss Institut has been working in the modern city of Aswan in order to study the ancient city of Syene (Swnw) since 1986. At the beginning, the works focused mainly on the Domitian temple, dedicated to the god Khnum (c. I CE) and the Isis temple, built during the reign of Ptolemy III (c II BCE). Nowadays the project, which covers a broader area in the city, is directed by Dr Cornelius von Pilgrim and the fieldwork in the old city of Aswan is directed by subdirector Dr Wolfgang Müller. The aim is to study the history of the settlements in the east bank of the ancient Syene, the twin city of Elpehantine, in the Greco-roman period. In Spring of 2019, the works focused in the so-called Area 3 (one of the areas where the institute started working in the ’80s). In the first picture, you can see Shadli in the foreground, and Mohammed (on the left), on the very first days of the Spring archaeological season. Behind them, late period settlements and the remains of the Domitian temple, which was the only building of the old Syene visible since antiquity, rest throughout time. Shadli and Mohammed were removing all the dirt and the palm trees around the temple so the archaeologists could have a general idea of the later structures in the area. The second picture is a candid portrait of Shadli during a moment he was resting off of the hard work removing the dirt. I specially love his kind gaze which brings (to me at least), some kind of peace. If you want to know more about the work carried out in Old Aswan/Syene you can visit the Swiss Institut’s website: www.http://swissinst.ch/ #swissinstitut #aswan #oldaswan #Syene #egypt #ancientegypt #settlement #ancientsite #culturalheritage #arcahaeology #archaeologicalsite #inthefield #temple #domitian #isis #knum #egyptiangods #ptolemyiii #pharaoh #lateperiod #grecoroman #photography #nikon #nikonD750 #environtmentalportrait #portrait #shootingcandid #bnwphotography #archaeologicalphotographer #archaeoinstagram

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